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Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly for 26 years. During that time he chaired the Subcommittee on Libraries for 10 years, and was Chair of the Committee on Higher Education for 16 years. He retired from the Assembly in 2002. He currently works as a political advisor and a free lance writer on political subjects.

Prior to his election to the Assembly, Mr. Sullivan taught English as a Second Language for 15 years, in Europe and in New york. He is the author of a text books on that subject.

Mr. Sullivan was born in New England, attended the Hamden Hall School in Connecticut, and graduated from the New School College in New York City.

Stories from Edward C. Sullivan

Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.
Monday, July 8th, 2013

For the last nine years, New York Civic has published articles about New York City and State government and politics. From time to time, we send our readers articles that others have written which we believe have particular meaning and value for New Yorkers.

Today, we submit to you, “Come Home to Reason,” written by Edward C. Sullivan, an intellectual who served 22 years in the New York state legislature, chairing the Assembly Committee on Higher Education until he retired voluntarily in 2009.

We think Mr. Sullivan’s article is a valuable contribution to the public dialogue. We hope that you think about what he is saying.

As long as our legislature includes people like Ed Sullivan, hope will remain.

Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.
Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

From time to time, we receive articles from talented writers which we think should be brought to our readers’ attention.

One of our most distinguished contributors is former Assemblyman Edward C. Sullivan, who represented the Upper West Side of Manhattan for 26 years. Here, Mr. Sullivan discusses various reform proposals for Albany to consider.  With wit and insight, he evaluates each idea and makes his recommendation.

You may well have your own feelings about the suggestions below and many others which have been offered. We encourage you to join the discussion below and let your voice be heard.

Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.
Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

The appearance of the new movie “42,” which tells the story of Jackie Robinson’s historic arrival in Major League Baseball, back in 1947, reminded me of a conversation I had with a friend in the 1980’s.

We were both Members of the New York State Assembly, I as a Democrat, he as a Republican. Despite our disagreement on many public issues, we were good friends. I asked him, on this occasion if he had read “The Boys Of Summer,” which I considered an excellent book. It was about the Brooklyn Dodgers of the 1940’s and 50’s, written by Roger Kahn, a sports reporter who had covered the exploits of the Dodgers back in the day.

My friend said he had not read the book, so I recounted one of the stories told in the book, that I thought he would find interesting.

Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.
Monday, February 25th, 2013

As we and other local media begin to focus sharply on this November’s municipal elections, New York Civic will bring you opinions and observations about various aspects of the election process. Contributors, including scholars, legislators and researchers, will offer essays and research material for further analysis and discussion by our readers.

The first of these articles comes from one of our regular contributors, former state Assemblyman, Edward C. Sullivan. Here, he explains the significance of primary voters in New York City, the importance campaigns place on this group and the influence they have on candidates and incumbent officeholders.

Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.
Thursday, December 13th, 2012

Former New York State Assemblyman Edward C Sullivan grew up in New England before migrating to New York City in 1957. Two years earlier he was in Hartford, Connecticut with family when a natural disaster struck. In the following weeks he was able to witness the response of a dedicated government official which helped instill in him the desire to serve the public and emulate the compassionate leadership he saw during that period.


 

Watching Governors Christie, Cuomo and Malloy, and Mayor Bloomberg, struggle with the devastation of Hurricane Sandy recalls for me a time 57 years ago, 1955, when twin hurricanes hit the northeastern United States, especially Connecticut, and Governor Abraham Ribicoff was the man of the moment.

About Author: 
Edward C. Sullivan served in the New York State Assembly from 1977 to 2002.